Justified Nature celebrates 12th episode in Addis Ababa!

Erica Licht founded Justified Nature in Lagos, Nigeria in 2012

Erica Licht founded Justified Nature in Lagos, Nigeria in 2012

Justified Nature celebrated its 12th episode here in Addis Ababa, yesterday. The show, launched in 2012 in Lagos, Nigeria, focuses on bridging justice and environmentalism through a lens of leadership and dialogue. Every show features a related guest and music from at least three countries/regions/genres.

Check out an article about the show on the Center for Creative Leadership’s Lead Beyond Blog from March 2014 HERE

This week’s show featured an interview with Dr. Million Belay, Founding Director of MELCA Ethiopa and Coordinator of the Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa; as well as music from South Africa, Jamaica, the US, and Cote d’Ivoire.

afro-1

Listen in to Justified Nature every Monday at 3-4pm Ethiopia Time or 8am EST.
Ways to listen:
LIVE via radio – 105.3 Afro FM
Live Stream – www.afro105fm.com
Via the TuneIn Application or TuneIn Website “Afro FM Page”

And if you are in Ethiopia, be sure to text your comments and questions in to *8444!

Advertisements

The Netherlands Faces an ‘Unfamiliar’ Tragedy: Too Few Prisoners

“Declining crime rates in the Netherlands mean that although the country has the capacity for 14,000 prisoners, there are only 12,000 detainees, reported the nrc.nl.

Furthermore….

A report last year on prison overcrowding said that surging populations undermined the rehabilitation of prisoners and risked increasing reoffending in the future.”

The Huffinton Post UK Reports:

uk.gif

Netherlands Close Eight Prisons Due To Lack Of Criminals

Huffington Post UK  |  Posted: 26/06/2013 17:44 BST  |  Updated: 16/09/2013 01:42 BST

As prison populations surge in the UK, with overcrowded cells and repeat offenders, the opposite is happening in the Netherlands.

The country is actually to close eight prisons because of a lack of criminals, the Dutch justice ministry has announced.

Declining crime rates in the Netherlands mean that although the country has the capacity for 14,000 prisoners, there are only 12,000 detainees, reported the nrc.nl.

The decrease is expected to continue, the ministry said, with Deputy justice minister Nebahat Albayrak saying that natural redundancy and other measures should counter any forced lay-offs.

A report last year on prison overcrowding said that surging populations undermined the rehabilitation of prisoners and risked increasing reoffending in the future.

The Criminal Justice Alliance (CJA), which represents more than 60 organisations, called for the government to urgently limit “the unnecessary use of prison, ensuring it is reserved for serious, persistent and violent offenders for whom no alternative sanction is appropriate”.

It came after Chief Inspector of Prisons Nick Hardwick said the rising pressure on prisons from budget cuts and increasing numbers cannot go on indefinitely.

See the article here.

Police Officers in Nepal Practice Yoga

Police in Nepal were reported to be overweight. The solution? Yoga. Providing weight loss as well as psychological betterment!

The Guardian
http://gu.com/p/3ft5x
“Police officers in Nepal are being asked to slim down as part of a new anti-obesity drive. Authorities set up a dedicated inspection team to check the 60,000-strong national force after concerns overweight officers would not be able to perform their duties. They are now being offered yoga classes and officer is given an individual fitness regime”

UNILAG Radio Interview

On the evening of Tuesday, November 13th, I was a guest on the show “Nature’s Cardinal,” on UNILAG 103.1 FM on the University of Lagos campus. It was great speaking with the show’s host Damilola McGregor about my research and experiences so far in Lagos, and a lot of fun joining the commentary of the show’s crew.

When a recording of the show becomes available I will post it here, but in the mean time I will highlight an anecdote of my discussion of the need to find creative solutions to the wahalas (problems) of the criminal justice system here in Lagos – overcrowding, long periods of awaiting trial, lack of record management – that draw attention to the vast expanses of open land and natural space which encircle Lagos, and the urban natural parks within it. Damilola joked, “So what do we do, open a garden in the middle of Bariga market?…Tell the people to move their stalls and foods, and plant some trees?” My response: “No and Yes”….

No, don’t make the people move and sacrifice their livelihood, but Yes, look for ways to insert nature or engagement with the natural into the lived experience of Lagos. Nature can be accessible, we just have to see it that way. It’s about changing our way of thinking about nature – as “not for me,” “inaccessible,” or “private and controlled,” many similar attitudes which Rue Mapp counters in her work in the United States with Outdoor Afro –  and pushing forward with new understandings of the natural environment. Replacing these negative attitudes with positive ones means seeing the potential to utilize nature as a classroom for teaching experiential education skills, as well as a site full of entrepreneurial opportunities.

The program ended with Dami and the crew conjuring me to recount a story I had told them before the show about my own criminality in an incident of goats and a destroyed watermelon rind on my recent trip to Enugu. Let’s just say, I thought the goats almost choked – in the midst of destroying the rind I had innocently left outside my friend’s house – and that I was going to be held responsible for the death of all three of the landlord’s precious pets.

Stay tuned for the recording of the show – as well as hopefully future appearances and partnership with UNILAG Radio 103.1!